Archives For February 2013

openvpnOpenVPN is great, it allows for easy access in a secure way. But how do you keep it secure? I mean, what if someone leaves your company? Do you disable access to the OpenVPN server? You should! In this blog I’ll show you how to do it.

A feature called revoking exists in OpenVPN. Revoking a certificate means to invalidate a previously signed certificate so that it can no longer be used for authentication purposes. For this to work, we need to tell the OpenVPN server which certificates are no longer valid.

All connecting clients will then have their client certificates verified against the so-called CRL (Certificate Revoking List). Any positive match will result in the connection being dropped. Your former employees will no longer have access, even if they still have their certificates.

Creating a certificate to test with
Before we start, let’s generate a dummy certificate for testing purposes:

cd /etc/openvpn/easy-rsa/2.0/
 . ./vars
./build-key unwanted-client-name

Verify you can connect to the OpenVPN server using this certificate. Refer to my earlier post for more info. Now that this works, I’ll show you how to revoke this certificate so you will no longer be able to connect.

Revoking a certificate
To revoke a certificate, we’ll use the ‘easy-rsa’ toolset.

cd /etc/openvpn/easy-rsa/2.0

If it’s not there, look at the OpenVPN examples and copy it:

cp -R /usr/share/doc/openvpn/examples/easy-rsa /etc/openvpn
cd /etc/openvpn/easy-rsa/2.0

Run this command to revoke the certificate called ‘unwanted-client-name’:

./revoke-all unwanted-client-name

You should see output similar to this:

Using configuration from /etc/openvpn/easy-rsa/2.0/openssl-1.0.0.cnf
Revoking Certificate 03.
Data Base Updated
Using configuration from /etc/openvpn/easy-rsa/2.0/openssl-1.0.0.cnf
unwanted-client-name.crt: C = NL, ST = ZH, L = City, O = Name, OU = pi.example.org, CN = unwanted-client-name, name = unwanted-client-name], emailAddress = openvpn@example.org
error 23 at 0 depth lookup:certificate revoked

Note the “error 23” in the last line. That is what you want to see, as it indicates that a certificate verification of the revoked certificate failed.

The index.txt file on keys directory will be updated. You’ll see an ‘R’ (for Revoked) on the first column from the left for your user when you run this:

cat keys/index.txt

You can also examine the CRL to see what’s in there:

openssl crl -in keys/crl.pem -text

Now copy the crl.pem file to the OpenVPN config directory:

cp keys/crl.pem /etc/openvpn/

Whenever you revoke a certificate, you’ve to copy it to the OpenVPN server.
Note: The CRL file is not secret, and should be made world-readable so that the OpenVPN daemon can read it after root privileges have been dropped.

Enable revoking support
Before it works, we need to setup the OpenVPN server to add support for revoking certificates. You’ve to do this only once.

Add the folowing line to the OpenVPN server config:

vim /etc/openvpn/server.conf
crl-verify /etc/openvpn/crl.pem

Reload the OpenVPN server to activate the revoke setting:

/etc/init.d/openvpn reload

Testing the revoked certificate
The final test: try to login again using the ‘unwanted-client-name’ certificate. It will not work anymore!

By revoking users, you disallow access to your OpenVPN server for users that previously had access. This should be done as soon as an user no longer needs access, as it is an important security feature.

suse-logoA few weeks ago I attended a full week of SUSE training, which I really enjoyed. There were lots of highly skilled geeks and the course had a nice solid pace. By the end of the week I did the CLE practicum exam (to become a Certified Linux Engineer). Today I heard I passed! 🙂

I’ve been working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server since I started my new job back in December and the training really helped me.

CLE training

Impression of the CLE training

 

Before I’m officially certified, there’s another step to take though. One needs to pass three exams: CLA, CLP and CLE. I’ve passed both CLA and CLE now, so I only need to pass the one in between. This happened because the course I attended was aimed towards RHCE certified professionals, which I am not (yet). So, either passing the CLP or RHCE practicum will bring in the CLE certification as well. Looking forward to continue the certification process!

PS: See this post for an overview of Linux certifications.

When you create firewall rules with iptables on Linux, you want to make them persistent over reboot, because they are not by default. Different Linux distributions have different methods of achieving this, although the basics are similar. I’ve been working with Debian, Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and in this blog I’ll describe how to configure each of them to save your iptables rules across reboots.

First the good news: the iptables package, the administration tool for packet filtering and NAT, always ships with Linux distributions. The package also includes the ‘iptables-save‘ and ‘iptables-restore‘ tools. These do what you might already expect from their names: save or restore iptables rules. ‘iptables-save‘ outputs to stdout, which you can save to a file:

iptables-save > /etc/iptables/rules

To load these again:

iptables-restore < /etc/iptables/rules

These really are the basics that work across Linux distributions and that you can use in your custom boot scripts. In addition to this, each Linux distribution has its own way to make this process easier.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL):
redhat-logo

RHEL (and the same counts for CentOS and Fedora) has some built in mechanism to help automate this. First of all, there are some settings in ‘/etc/sysconfig/iptables-config‘:

IPTABLES_SAVE_ON_STOP=”yes”
IPTABLES_SAVE_ON_RESTART=”yes”

You can set them to “yes” to have persistent iptables rules. In fact, there are many more settings in that file that allow for finer control. That’s all, since the rest is handled automatically.

At any time it’s possible to save the current state. Just run:

service iptables save

And it will, like on reboot, save the rules to: ‘/etc/sysconfig/iptables‘. Pretty easy and pretty powerful!

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES 11):

suse-logo SLES (and the same counts for OpenSUSE) is yet another story. SLES 11 now ships with SUSE Firewall. Instead of defining the rules yourself, you tell Yast what you want to achieve and it generates the needed iptables rules for you. Although SUSE Firewall does allow you to add custom rules, it isn’t really designed for it. The tool is pretty nice though, because it integrates fully with Yast and allows for easy maintenance of rules. When you install a package, it automatically opens the associated port, for example.

This all might seems a bit scary for us sysadmins, right?! Don’t worry, it’s still possible to manage rules on your own by disabling SUSE Firewall. But have a look at it first, as you might as well like it.

To start the SUSE Firewall admin module, run:

yast2 firewall

The interface is pretty self-explaining. Afterwards, to activate the changes run:

SuSEfirewall2

It’s even possible to by-pass Yast, and edit the config file directly. It’s safe to combine the two methods, no problem.

vim /etc/sysconfig/SuSEfirewall2

For example, to open a port you’d edit the ‘FW_SERVICES_EXT_TCP’ variable. Just make a list (space separated) with protocols you want to allow. These protocols refer to files in ‘/etc/sysconfig/SuSEfirewall2.d’.

Like with using Yast, activate the changes when you’re done.

SuSEfirewall2

I’ve used it for some time and it’s actually pretty easy. It just depends on the project whether or not to use it, I guess.

Debian
debian-logoWhen I was using Debian (same counts for Ubuntu as well), I used to create a small shell script and place it in ‘/etc/network/if-pre-up.d’. Just before the network interface is brought up, the iptables rules will be restored. The idea is to do the same when the interface goes down (use the ‘/etc/network/if-post-down.d’ folder to place the script in). Using these thechniques, you can create something and have fine control over it.

Recently I heard about a tool called ‘iptables-persistent’ that can automate this out-of-the-box. Here’s the package description:

iptables-persistent - boot-time loader for iptables rules: Current iptables rules can be saved to the configuration file '/etc/iptables/rules.v4'. These rules will then be loaded automatically during system startup.

To install it:

sudo apt-get install iptables-persistent

During install, the program asks to save both ipv4 and ipv6 iptables rules. Please note this counts for Wheezy, the current stable release uses the file ‘/etc/iptables/rules’.

To manually save the iptables rules, run:

/etc/init.d/iptables-persistent save

Although this should be done automatically when you reboot. It looks like the Red Hat way of doing things, but just with an extra package installed.

Conclusion: 
iptables all over the place, just with different tooling to automate it 🙂